Netflix has confirmed that it is removing AirPlay support from its iOS application due to ‘technical limitations’.

My concern with this is that it’s taking away one very useful feature – the ability to stream Netflix shows on TVs that have built-in AirPlay (and subsequently AirPlay 2) support. If you’re doing a lot of travelling – whether for business or pleasure – this can be extremely useful.

You could argue that a lot of TVs have a built-in Netflix app already? Yes, this is true. But many hotel TVs don’t. Will Netflix look to make up for potential connectivity problems by attempting to sell dongles or TVs with Netflix built to hoteliers?

I don’t want to have to provide credentials for my Netflix account to completely strange TV setups. AirPlay ensures that my credentials stay secure on my phone (though I’d use a VPN if I was on a hotel Wi-Fi – which could cause problems with Netflix’s policy of using VPNs – another problem Netflix has got to sort out because using a VPN has legitimate uses).

What next, Netflix? The ability to output content from Netflix via Lightning/USB-C to HDMI (which would enable you to hook up Netflix from an iPhone or iPad to a TV or monitor)?

Netflix is becoming awkward on the iOS platform because its app doesn’t support the interactive features that are present in the Black Mirror special, Bandersnatch. And this means other planned titles are unlikely to work either.

The Netflix app on Sky Q is becoming a big problem too. I frequently find that the app on the Sky Q box keeps crapping out, forcing me to switch over to the Apple TV 4K. The Netflix app on the Sky Q can handle interactive features but given that I consider the Sky Q app to be unstable, it’s not

Is the once durable and available everywhere Netflix app becoming a liability and non-consumer friendly? It certainly looks like it. And if Netflix continues on this path, and increases the subscription price, it will be a streaming/cable service like any other and I’m going to stop subscribing.

In the distant past, as a Mac user, I’ve been somewhat ambivalent to using anti-virus/anti-malware due to MacOS’ methods of supposedly going above and beyond to stop the user from running potentially harmful programs by accident. But as time has gone on, these methods haven’t been terribly effective and, as we have also seen, due to bugs within MacOS, it would be fairly trivial to do extensive damage to a Mac system. So it’s essential that all MacOS users have some form of anti-virus/anti-malware protection in place.

For the past few years, I’ve been running a mix of ESET Cybersecurity Pro, Bitdefender, and most recently, Sophos Home Premium. I found ESET to be painfully slow when accessing files via WebDAV or network file stores, and BitDefender’s main window keeps popping up whenever the Mac is started – which is very annoying. That said, performance wise, Bitdefender has been excellent across the network and local filesystems.

I’ve put my dad on my personal Bitdefender license (he runs Windows) because I have an unlimited device license which expires in two years time. He can manage everything easily within the application, or if I am ever needed, I can log into a central cloud based interface and take a look from there.

At work, I was tasked at finding a replacement for ESET which at the time was managed through a server application that was hosted on the Active Domain controller. I find ESET’s user interface to be a bit of a pain in the arse. So I explored a number of options, one of them being Bitdefender’s enterprise product. But I settled for Sophos Intercept-X Advanced with EDR because of its ability to drill down processes on endpoints to determine how malware gets into the network. We can enforce a number of policies relating to threat assessment, web browsing, device encryption, and along with how external devices are used. My only complaint with this system is that:

  • Device encryption is limited to OS support – so this includes Windows 10 Pro or better for BitLocker, and MacOS for FileVault. On the other hand, Sophos Central makes the management of BitLocker massively easier – including managing recovery keys and letting users set their own BitLocker passwords.
  • Firewall management is limited to Windows Group Policies. There is no support for the Mac. The system does not include any kind of third-party Sophos firewall which I feel would make it much easier to unify firewall policies across estates like ours which utilise Mac and Windows machines.

Sophos Central, the cloud based management system, makes managing all this very easy – and to keep an eye on who uses each machine and to identify any potential dodgy program or file. The endpoint client tends to keep itself maintained pretty well.

And all this has lead to Sophos Home Premium. Thanks to two beta programs I have been using a free license (which expires in February 2020) and it’s generally been pretty good. For the longest time that I can remember, Sophos never had a consumer product. Now we have something that shares a common core with its commercial brethren, including advanced ransomware protection.

Sophos Home Premium web interface is clean and elegant, yet lacking

There are a number of issues, however:

  • The Mac version of Sophos Home Premium is lacking some features from the Windows version. It’s also behind a number of point version releases.
  • The entire user interface is almost entirely controlled from a web front-end in which you’ll need internet access. You cannot add additional users to the account to allow them to manage their own machine (unlike Bitdefender).
  • Web filtering does not let you see the sites that it’ll filter – only by category. Neither can you add sites to be blocked, only exceptions.
  • Lack of options for Ransomware, along with other related functions – you can only provide exceptions to volumes and paths. Microphone and webcam blocking doesn’t allow for exceptions.
  • New activity is difficult to clear away. It gets a bit overly zealous whenever anything happens – good or bad.

Sophos Home Premium is quite pricey given the lack of control and everything being handled through the cloud (unlike the commercial version we use which has a number of offline options). While I appreciate the average consumer isn’t going to need a tonne of bells and whistles to tinker about with, having an advanced mode (online or offline) would be highly beneficial if anything needed to be whitelisted.

I’m sticking with Sophos Home Premium on my own Mac for now, and come February next year I’ll decide whether to remain with it, or move back to Bitdefender which has been my go-to anti-virus/anti-malware for the past year.

The above happened while I was working from home, having started work at 6 am and was about to knock off for the day.

The problem is that this is a regular occurrence with my neighbours who leave their dogs in the house all day. I’d come home around 8pm and their dogs will bark and howl until about 10 pm when they come home. While that’s a perfectly normal thing for most dog owners, I’m sure the barking and howling isn’t – and is likely due to behavioural elements that could be improved with training.

I’ve said nothing so far, but I feel it’s about time I said something, as it’s entirely possible they don’t even know this is happening.

Could be worse, though. I remember when the former occupants were doing up the place and I had to suffer through the following (a remix from various sound that I turned into an iPhone alarm):

Yesterday, Hive Home suffered a major outage which prevented control of Hive systems remotely (from the app or the web site). Symptoms included being unable to log into the Hive web site and the app being able to control individual products.

Update: information on the recent outage can be found at The Register. I never received the apology email. No, it did not get sent to Spam. Checked G Suite’s email log. Nothing except the semi-regular updates which had been flowing normally since 14th March.

As you can see the Hive Home status page (which took them a while to update), it has been a rough ride. But thankfully the thermostat and the receiver continued to work manually. The lights? Not so much. Even now, the group of lights which I’ve allocated to my living room doesn’t appear in the circle view (yet they do in the list view) – but then again, I had to recreate the group because whatever is causing this problem nuked my groups.

Given the number of problems I’ve experienced with Hive Home over the past month or so, I am increasingly concerned that my decision to swap out my thermostat with the Hive system (which cost me £50 more than the quoted repair from British Gas) was a bad one.

Speaking of Centrica’s muck-ups, did I mention that I should have HomeCare with my boiler? I don’t appear to because:

  • No documentation was ever sent in the post, with the exception of confirming of cancellation of another HomeCare account which was created in error due to the circumstances of the thermostat being broken and they had to charge £99 for the call out first. It took Centrica THREE months to get that cancellation confirmation out.
  • No direct debits have been taken in respect to any HomeCare subscription, and never has any Direct Debit been established.
  • No options within my British Gas account as to any options relating to HomeCare.

The irony of all of this is that I’ve switched to a British Gas product with basic boiler and pipe protection and having had all this confirmed in emails, would suggest that HomeCare was never truly established on my account in the first place. Even worse – when the tarrif change was confirmed, the emails neglect to publish my address properly – having had previous British Gas correspondence sent to the wrong address in the not too distant past, this worries me.

In short: Centrica – sort your systems and processes out. They’re buggy, inconsistent, and horribly unstable.

In other news: I shall be shortly shouting big time at Sky who have charged me an early termination fee for Sky Broadband despite telling me by phone that I would not be charged an early termination fee for cancellation because (a) I was out of the minimum contract term and (b) I was eligible to cancel without penalty anyway because they announced price rises for their broadband.

Is it just me? As technology marches on, it gets buggier, less reliable and ultimately becomes a burden. It’s like a stupid SkyNet. Terminator 27: Stupid Day.

Google’s really needs to work towards a better solution that would allow their business product, G Suite, to function with consumer products such as the Google Home Hub and Google Home Mini as they are, by and large, incompatible.

I understand why – businesses are not going to want potential confidential data being leaked out to consumer devices (which Google definitely see these devices as being). Yet as the admin for my G Suite domain, surely I should make that decision? Surely Google should be thinking about the option to allow calendar data from G Suite accounts to be allowed with the Google Home Hub and

We use Joan at work. And it’s useful for letting people know who is using a meeting room. And they’ve just added functionality to customise a button on the screen which would allow anybody to connect to a guest Wi-Fi network. If we tried something similar with Google, well, there isn’t anything that Google offers that could do similar.

Joan caught napping on the job

I wasn’t very keen with Amazon’s Echo Show, so I sold it. It doesn’t integrate well into the stuff I use, and when it does, getting it to do anything useful requires having to remember syntax. Google’s home assistants are – when I’ve tried them – much better. But G Suite is hindering my use of them – and thus I can’t buy any of their products until they work on a system that allows G Suite (or a organisation unit of it) to be able to share data with these devices.

I love G Suite. I really do. I’ve been using it since 2006 when it first came out in beta. I’ve been a Top Contributor on their forums for a while, and ended up as a paying customer for well over 12 years. It gives me business grade email using only a web client. It does away with many of the problems email clients and email servers suffer from, and the overall experience is just delightful. And the number of features it offers (and supports) is fantastic. We have G Suite at work too, and the experience of using it in a proper business environment has been nothing short of miraculous versus the old clunky IMAP email clients that I used to use in all my previous places of employment.

But I really do want to use G Suite with Google’s consumer range of products. I’d even be willing to try moving back to the Pixel range of phones again (though I’ll have to wait until September next year as I have an Apple Watch which cannot be used without an iPhone).

Come on, Google, let’s find a solution to this!