EasyApache 4: Making cPanel/WHM more sysadmin friendly

One of the reasons for popping up to Edinburgh last week was to hear various representatives from cPanel/WHM talk about the many features of the cPanel/WHM ecosystem as well as glimpsing upcoming new features to make everybody’s life a bit more easier.

As as systems administrator of some 20 years (has it been that long?), I am most comfortable with a command line interface and a decent text editor.  cPanel/WHM provides a user friendly web interface to many of the complex tasks that one would to go through to configure a web hosting environment.  But I must admit to loving cPanel/WHM just as I love the command line because it is easier to set-up a blog like this through cPanel/WHM than it would take me to set-up nginx, php-fpm, MySQL (or MariaDB, or PerconaDB) from scratch.  That said, to get the very best out of cPanel/WHM, you should still know some Linux commands because not everything can (or should be) handled through a web interface.

As cPanel/WHM development storms ahead, we’re getting to the point where cPanel/WHM is becoming more standardised so that you’ll be able to manage it just as you would any other kind of bare bones Linux box, with full LSB compliance (with configuration files and scripts in meaningful places) along with full API and command line support for most features.

With the forthcoming EasyApache 4, for example, you can set-up Apache and PHP through the use of RPMs rather than having to wait for cPanel/WHM to compile everything for you.  I cannot tell you how much faster it is installing everything through a Linux package management system.

EasyApache 4 is still considered beta, with plans for it to be released within the next major release of cPanel/WHM – version 58, which is about 12-16 weeks away.  Beta or not, EasyApache 4 is perfectly serviceable right now.  With EasyApache 4, it’ll make it much easier for folk to run multiple versions of PHP (so older sites can run PHP 5.3/5.4 and WordPress and the ilk can run PHP 7).  Of course, one would recommend deploying CloudLinux to provide a greater amount of segregation and security for the older, potentially more exploitable apps, but this feature in EasyApache 4 makes it possible for all folk to run multiple versions of PHP side-by-side.

There will still be a user interface to configure EasyApache profiles.  Indeed, I used it to specify the relevant Apache and PHP packages for this server.  The MultiPHP INI editor is a wonderful inclusion that makes it dead simple to go through all the php.ini options and set them to your liking.  The changes will be applied to whatever PHP handler is being used.

Full PHP-FPM support is among one of the biggest and greatest features I’ve been waiting for in cPanel/WHM.  It should be fully supported in version 58, but I’m making great use of it right now with a bit of command line tinkering.  I’m running this blog (and the stats system) on PHP 7 with PHP-FPM.  It wasn’t difficult, and I find that I’m loving the performance from having made the effort.  Having nginx would be a nice have (as a web server rather than as a front end proxy to Apache), but beggars can’t be choosers and Apache 2.4’s performance is pretty decent as it is.