300Mbs down, 50Mbs up – that’s pretty darn ludicrous

After nearly 6 months with Zen Internet, I’ve decided to upgrade to their fastest package – Ultimate Fibre 4 – which should give me a top speed of 300Mbs download and 50Mbs upload. And it only costs an extra £8 per month.

It ties me into a new 12-month contract, but I’ve been very happy with Zen’s performance over the past few months. And I’m still extremely happy with the Amplifi kit I purchased too – especially as I’ve seen some really decent Wi-Fi performance gains through firmware updates, and the latest firmware release gives me the ability to VPN back into my home network via the Teleport app.

As I work from home at least one day a week, it’ll get to the point where my home broadband will (vaguely) match that of the work connection – so using a VPN will ensure that any file transfers will remain fast.

I’ll report back when the connection goes live.

This weekend I wrap up the pain in the arse Nighthawk X10 router and send it back to Amazon. In its place is Ubiquiti Networks’ Amplifi HD, a wonderful boxy router that actually looks good wherever it’s positioned.

It’s interesting to note that Wi-Fi performance isn’t spectacular. I’m still trying to figure out whether this is a Wi-Fi thing, or whether it has to do with single-thread performance (not necessarily to do with Zen Internet).

I can absolutely max out my broadband’s 141Mbs download speed from the iPhone if I launch multiple downloads from iTunes (single download lands around 100Mbs). Speedtest.net shows around anywhere between 35Mbs-80Mbs (multi). Across the network (with MacBook Pro acting as server, connected via ethernet), it’s around 195Mbs.

The Mac, like the iPhone and iPad, can also saturate bandwidth on Wi-Fi if multiple threads from the likes of Steam and iTunes are running – but single threaded operations aren’t great. And I’ve never understood why this 2018 MacBook Pro keeps reporting back that the link speed is 54Mbs. The iPhone too seems to report back a poor receive rate of just 6Mbs from looking at the client stats via the Amplifi iOS app.

I’ve also not ruled out that the latest iPhones and Macs simply just have exceptionally poor Wi-Fi transceivers in them. Hooking the Mac up to one of the Amplifi’s HD 4 gigabit ethernet ports yields 141Mbs speedtest.net download results every single time. So I’m keeping the Mac on ethernet for the foreseeable future despite a bit of cable management bodge work.

Bodge job on the cable management here – but it’s to stop pressure on the USB-C port

That said, there have been no problems with the Hive home network since installing the Amplifi, and quite frankly, it looks good sitting in the middle of the room:

The LCD display can display time & date, total amount of data transferred, current speeds and port status.

Speaking of the Hive home network, they very kindly sent me a signal booster which sits in the middle of the room and ensuring – hopefully – a strong signal is sent between the thermostat and the Hive hub.

It’s tiny! Just plug it into an electrical socket, add it as a new device to your app and job done.

This weekend I’ll be adding a mesh point to the set-up. It’ll be located in the master bedroom and hopefully, will give me the strongest signal there. I have an Apple TV HD (3rd gen) which is connected via Wi-Fi. It’ll unlikely improve single thread performance again, but at least there will be no more Wi-Fi dead spots upstairs. If that works, I might need one more mesh point at the back of the house to ensure all over coverage.

No, Nighthawk. I’m not receiving you. I’m sending you back to Amazon!

My British Gas smart meter and Hive system went offline – again, and I’m putting the blame firmly on the Netgear X10 Nighthawk router – the one that looks like Hela from Thor: Ragnarok.

On Saturday morning I awoke to find that the British Gas Smart Meter had taken itself offline along with the Hive thermostat and receiver (and subsequently the app). Another call to Hive support eventually got things going again, but this time I was informed that the signal strength was all over the place.

However, I have a bone to pick with Centrica and Hive support – they’ve moved their support pages without setting up 301 redirects. The result is this – a massive SEO fail:

One problem I did have after getting the system back online was that one of the Hive lightbulbs had stopped responding. My living room’s front light. So I had to turn the lighbulb on and off 7 times before it reset and was able to be picked up by the Hive system again. As these lightbulbs act as a signal booster, I was wondering if these things had any part to play in all these problems. Whenever there have been a problem with the Hive system, the lights on my Netgear ProSAFE switch were constantly flashing – all at the same time – and in time with each other. Rebooting the Netgear Nighthawk fixed this, and things settled down to their regular on/off blinking.

So I decided to send the Nighthawk back to Amazon. And this is an odd thing. Amazon sent the thing via DPD. In order to return it, I have to drop it off at a Hermes drop-off place, or via the Royal Mail. It’d be nice, given the heft of the product, if Amazon could pick it up.

I’ve been using the Fritz! Box again for the past couple of days and haven’t had any dropouts from the British Gas smart meter or Hive. I am going to try the Amplifi HD mesh system which costs slightly less than the Netgear router, but should – hopefully – be a considerably better performer. The manufacturer of the system, Ubiquiti Networks, is a highly respected company within the networking community.

In fact, I specified and arranged the purchase of their UniFi system at work. And all that was based around on the antics of MarzBar (Alex Brooks) who, at the age of 18 set-up an entire WISP (wireless internet service provider) and uses Ubiquiti kit extensively. And here’s Alex explaining how the Amplifi system works: