Alas poor Xbox One X, I didn’t use you as much as I’d have liked. You became a bit of a brick sitting underneath the TV gathering dust. Hence it was off to the local CeX for you, and in with a Sony UDB-X700 mid-range UltraHD (4K) Blu-Ray player.

The problem with modern console gaming is not only having to buy the console in the first place, but you also have to factor in:

  • A Multi-player subscription (Xbox Live in the case of the Xbox, or Playstation Plus for the PlayStation) – an extra monthly or yearly cost.
  • Cost of the games. This varies – but usually between £40-£100 depending on the game and publisher. The alternative is a subscription service such as the Xbox Games Pass or PS Now for PlayStation.
  • In-game purchases. Extra skins, weapons, whatever.

I’ve determined that given the overall level of gaming I do versus the number of movies I watch via Blu-Ray or UltraHD Blu-Ray, I’d be bettter off with a dedicated player. A player which didn’t have a hard drive in it which would be a pain in the neck to replace if it were to fail.

So the Xbox One X has gone and has been replaced by a Sony UDB-X700 UltraHD (4K) player. I’ve always been a big fan of Sony products, and the UDB-X700 is no exception. It’s a mid-range device which has won many awards – including a coveted What Hi-Fi? 2018 Award. One of the things that attracted me to it was a decent remote control (you try finding a decent remote with the Xbox One X), HDR->SDR conversion (my LG 4K television does not have HDR because I bought it too early – frigging technology, eh?), and built-in app support for Netflix, BBC iPlayer, etc.

The Sony UDB-U700 in all its glory

Actually, the last thing doesn’t matter too much to me – the Apple 4K TV does pretty much all of the “smart” TV stuff (alongside the Sky Q box and even my LG TV’s ageing WebOS which doesn’t see anywhere near the same level of commitment in updates from TVs from 2017 onwards). The Sony apps are decent enough, though I found that when it first streams content the picture is all blurry until it’s had a chance to play catchup and buffer enough data to continue. The Apple TV and Sky Q box does not do this. But’s nice to have a backup, just in case. And besides, I DO like the big Netflix button on this player’s remote control.

The picture quality is excellent regardless of whether or not you have an HDR TV. And the HDR to SDR conversion thing is a new feature I’ve never come across before, but does – I suppose, having not seen HDR before (thanks, LG, thanks) – do a good job. Adjusting the setting during playback allows you to adjust the conversion. Apparently setting it high will result in an image that is closest to HDR, but you pay for it in reduced picture brightness.

Audio is fine. I don’t have any Dolby Atmos speakers or even a surround sound system. I usually pipe all audio through my TV to drown out the neighbours (especially their frigging noisy dogs). But very good stereo reproduction from what I’ve played so far. Very sharp, very crisp.

All in all, an excellent player at a decent price. Having owned the super pricey and now utterly defunct Oppo UDP-203 a few years ago (sold to somebody who truly appreciates the Oppo line of devices despite they’re leaving the audio-visual market), this unit certainly gives as good as it gets. And Sony isn’t about to give up making audio-visual devices any time soon!

9/10