I’ve bought hook, line and sinker into the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) ever since Iron Man was first released back in 2008. And Disney has done exceedingly well with their $4 billion acquisition. Recent profits have suggested they’ve made over $18 billion over the past 11 years.

I’ve generally enjoyed all the films – and watched most of them at the cinema – but time and work usually gets in the way of getting the best cinema experience, so I’ve seen a few at home. I, unfortunately, missed out on Avengers: Endgame – the much-anticipated sequel to Avengers: Infinity Wars which I did see in the cinema. I’ve been trying to avoid spoilers like the plague, and Disney/Marvel has yet to re-release the film in UK cinemas before the UK digital home release on the 19th August (alleged date). It is, of course, available on US digital home release. Disney, an avid tax credits collector when filming in the UK, puts us Brits in second place as they usually do.

I was up in Edinburgh when Marvel was filming Avengers: Infinity Wars.

So it’s kind of made things like the SDCC (San Diego Comic-Con) announcements a massive no-no in terms of news. While I appreciate that distribution windows are set to maximise bums on seats and profits (see my interview with Jane Goldman about this), trying to avoid spoilers in a country with a different release schedule is a massive pain in the arse! Disney can and should do better.

But at least Marvel has released Captain Marvel which helps fill in a few gaps between Avengers: Infinity Wars and Avengers: Endgame. It also introduces us to a young Nick Fury who, up until the events in this film, had never encountered an extraterrestrial before.

Captain Marvel is a fun film – much in the vein of Guardians of the Galaxy or even the recent Thor: Ragnarok. And you can’t be mad at a film in which does something very unusual with a lovable feline during the end battle. It’s also a sad film. Stan Lee passed away during editing, so Marvel’s usual opening logo features images of Stan during his regular cameos and some behind the scenes stuff before fading to black with the words centred in the middle of the screen:

THANK YOU STAN

Indeed, thank you, Stan. And thank you, Steve Ditko. And thank you Jack Kirby and all the others that worked with Stan to produce some of the finest characters and storylines in comics history. Without Stan Lee, we wouldn’t have these movies. And speaking more of Stan, he’s here in cameo form albeit during a period in which he was starting to become seriously unwell – sitting on a train and reading the script to Kevin Smith’s Mallrats (in which he has a small, but important role). It’s a lovely nod to both Stan – and indeed Kevin.

Brie Larson makes a marvellous Captain Marvel, and with a sequel announced (it’s been very difficult to ignore SDCC announcements), the universe is in good hands.

What I don’t understand is why so many people – mainly men – that were so bitter towards Captain Marvel (to the extent that Rotten Tomatoes, the review aggregator) had to step in and remove a substantial number of bitter reviews. I’m definitely seeing a trend in fandom where toxic elements are trying very hard to spoil things for all.

Later this month, I’ll be attending a special book launch for the biography of Ronnie Le Drew, a professional puppeteer who has worked extensively in the TV, film and theatre industries.

For my whole life, I’ve always been interested in puppets and puppetry. I grew up with the likes of Zippy, Bungle, and George. Sooty, Sweep and Soo. Rod Hull and Emu. Basil Brush, Roland Rat, and many more besides. The Muppets were a big thing in our household too (if only I could find the photo of me and my cousins sitting around the TV watching The Muppet Show – it was the most 80’s photo you could ever imagine thanks to our tracksuits and furniture coverings).

When I was older, I wanted to work for the Jim Henson Creature Shop helping design and build the computer performance systems that powered some of their most advanced animatronic creations. I didn’t particularly want to be a puppeteer so much, though this photo suggests otherwise:

A Young Blofeld welcomes Mr. Bond whilst petting his vicious Emu
Signed DVD from Frank Oz (Miss Piggy, Fozzy Bear, and also a damn good director)

The irony was that I’d end up working for a visual effects company that would replace traditional puppets with all-CG versions – this was the case for the film Ella Enchanted in which Heston the Snake was originally going to be a practical puppet, but was instead entirely CG (and voiced by Steve Coogan).

But nevertheless, I still love the art of puppetry and the people behind the performance. I’ve already had the great privilege to meet Louise Gold about 20 years ago, who was an active member of Jim Henson’s Muppet performers during the time The Muppet Show was being recorded in England. She’s an extraordinary all-around performer and was most recently seen in Fiddler on the Roof in the West End.

So it’ll be nice to meet Ronnie and fellow fans at the launch of his new book in a few weeks time. I already have a copy of the book in Kindle format, but I’m going to wait a bit before reading because a good book is like a good wine. Best enjoyed slowly.

Zippy and Me: My Life Inside Britain’s Most Infamous Puppet can be pre-ordered via Amazon.co.uk.

Meanwhile, Ronnie’s antics as Zippy can be found in this infamous not-for-public (whoops) video:

And there’s also this 23 minute documentary about Ronnie on his career: