The day Netflix came to town..

Currently airing on the Netflix, the subscription internet TV streaming service is a title called The End of the F***ing World.  It is an adaptation of a graphic novel and was made by E4 and Netflix.

Sometime in early May 2017, I received the following letter – as did all my neighbours – about upcoming filming on our street.  For me, having worked on a fair number of Hollywood blockbusters in my time (granted, in the post-production sector – though I did do a bit of travelling and got to studios and even set visits on the odd occasion), the whole thing felt surreal.  I blanked out bits to protect phone numbers and locations.

I only started seeing them set-up for the filming on the day itself (one day after my 41st birthday!) as I had to head to work, but the final shots can be seen in the cafe sequence in episode one of The End of The F***ing World in which our two protagonists (or maybe even antagonists – it’s certainly not a black and white situation) are having something to eat – you can see the road I live on (but thankfully not my house) in the background.

As for the show itself?  It’s extremely dark.  Somebody compared it to a really messed up Wes Anderson film.  I kind of thought it felt like Harold & Maude, but except Maude being a teenager and a lot more antagonistic (at least in the beginning).  Whatever you compare it to, the whole thing is a very dark tale.  But it must be said that the performances from the two leads are outstanding, and production values are top notch.

Sky Q UHD: It’s here, but we don’t have any content yet..

Sky has enabled UHD (Ultra High Definition) output on the Sky Q Silver boxes, and thankfully it works with my TV.  My biggest gripe with UHD has been that it has taken so long for engineers and their Lord High Muck-a-mucks to agree on a set of standards that make UHD a possibility.  The transition to UHD/4K has been quite the palaver in comparison to say, standard definition to HD.

But anyway, Sky has enabled UHD 2160p at 10 bit colour resolution, and we’re ready for all that lovely 4K content.  Except, ALAS, most TV and film workflows haven’t taken 4K into account either due to budgetary or technical constraints.  For example,  UHD content takes up more disk space, has a higher bitrate, and working with it on most systems is a PITA unless you’ve got decent disk I/O, RAM and CPU – which, trust me, isn’t the case for a lot of TV companies. Plus of course, you’ve got to record video in 4K in the first place – a lot of professional film & TV digital video cameras can do this now, and have been for a while – and at even higher resolutions too – but due to everything I’ve just mentioned, hasn’t developed a full 4K workflow yet.

Then there’s the delivery issue.  You’ve got to generally have fast enough bandwidth to get the data to your TV.  This is helped in part due to the video codec.  With Sky Q, 4K content will be delivered via just one of the 12 tuners in the Sky Q box.  Other content will be delivered via the Sky Q download service which uses broadband.  Since Sky’s VoD system downloads rather than streams, this won’t be a big problem for a vast majority of Sky Q customers with slower connections.

I already watch some 4K content via Netflix streaming.  Amazon Video is still lacking considerable content.  In both cases you can normally see a difference from normal HD – but it depends on the DoP and director as to just how much 4K will matter.  Your camera phone may record 4K video as well, but it makes no difference if you’re just recording people falling over or having amusing accidents.

I’m replacing my Xbox One with the XBox One S next week which will give me the ability to watch UHD Blu-Ray discs.  It will be the cheapest way to watch UHD Blu-Ray content versus expensive (£500+) from the likes of Samsung and Sony.  Also, better integration with Windows 10 makes an Xbox a good companion in the living room.  Well, that’s what I told myself anyway.  Although I do wish Microsoft would have released a better remote control for the Xbox One.  The official one is a PITA.  I’d like something resembling a normal Blu-Ray player remote, and not a cut-down game controller.

The UHD revolution is finally here, but we need Sky to start pushing out content – both live (especially sports – but I don’t subscribe to those channels), and on demand (Sky Cinema movies in 4K – yes please!)