You don’t need ransomware to make me WannaCry about Windows..

Windows Servers.  What a load of old tosh.  The past three weeks or so have seen me tinkering unnecessarily with the blasted things because of Microsoft’s inability to write an operating system which is so super sensitive to hardware changes – principally because of licensing – that just by upgrading underlying virtualisation software triggers the operating system to think it has a new network card.  You can imagine the chaos something like that can cause!

It’s not just that which makes me despise Windows Server.  For similar reasons, if a dedicated server chassis dies and needs to be swapped out – you’d better have a spare because any hardware changes will cause Windows to freak out.  Linux has no problem with such things providing you’re using a modern distribution and reasonably up to date hardware.  Generally speaking, with maybe a very few exceptions, Linux Just Works(tm).

Don’t get me started on those people that are still running the now 15 year old Windows 2003.. (though this article about Fasthosts running Windows 2003 for their backup platform made me laugh a lot more than it should – and bury my hands in my face for leaving an obsolete OS in charge of managing critical customer backups).

The whole WCry situation around these parts has been, strangely, pretty good – indeed, a lot more people have taken an interest in their backups and patching their systems and this is only to be commended.  A good old major outbreak tends to kick people in the teeth and get them thinking about disaster recovery.

Just because I use MacOS and Linux isn’t making me complacent – oh no.  Very recently Apple just released updates to iOS, MacOS and WatchOS to fix a rather nasty exploit, as well as general performance updates.  It’s one of the reasons I went back to iOS – Apple has become very good at rolling out updates much faster and on schedule than the likes of Samsung.

The server on which this blog runs on utilises something called KernelCare which patches the kernel in real time for newly discovered exploits.  This has the advantage of:

  1. Not having to wait for the OS vendor to release a patch.
  2. You don’t have to reboot the machine.

In my testing of KernelCare, it has worked very well.  If you’re using it in a VPS, it must support full virtualisation – paravirtualisation won’t cut it.

Meanwhile, Microsoft should stick to producing office productivity software and gaming (Xbox One) – it’s what they’re good at.  I’ve completely lost faith in their desktop and server operating system divisions.

Flim Flam Film Spam

I am convinced somebody out there is putting themselves out there as a spammer-for-hire for a number of UK film distributors.  It’s all exceptionally dodgy because the spammer is utilising a number of domains (far too many) and super cheap web hosting outside the UK where dedicated servers are super cheap – the bandwidth doubly so.

There appears to be absolutely no logic to the spammers mailing list of spamees – it feels completely random.  You’d think they’d use a list of known investors with money to burn, but this feels like it’s targeting individuals, promising them many riches and rewards for investing in the UK film industry.

The latest spam originates from a Spanish server.  The Spanish web host/ISP doesn’t offer an abuse@ email address (which they should under the relevant published RFCs), plus the unsubscription URL is invalid – it doesn’t resolve.

I’ve been in contact with the distribution company mentioned in the spam, asking them if they’re aware of the email (it could be they not, and the whole spam thing is a massive scam – in which case, the distribution company had better be informed so they can take action against the spammers themselves).  I doubt I’ll hear back, but it’s better to let them know than not.

If you do want to invest in British film – ignore random spam.  Look towards the BFI whom I’m sure can advise accordingly.  And remember – there have been a number of high profile court cases filed by the HMRC about tax schemes regarding alleged tax avoidance.  So it’s vital to get the correct advice.

Stay safe.

Apple owes a lot of money, but thankfully a new iPhone model is around the corner..

Personally, I don’t think Apple will get away with an appeal.  But I reckon it’ll make Apple think about where they’re going to want to put their next European HQ.  Probably a country which is in the process of leaving the EU…

Regardless, we can probably expect iPhone 7 announcements next Wednesday.  But I don’t care.  I’ve got my Samsung Galaxy Note 7, and it’s a thing of beauty.  This little (haha – but in all seriousness, even at 5.7″, it’s not as big as you might imagine) thing will have to last me at least a year – if not two.  But that’s okay, it’s got enough oomph in it to last the course.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Samsung Galaxy Note 7.. DON'T PANIC!
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Samsung Galaxy Note 7.. DON’T PANIC!

In comparison to the S7 Edge:

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 (left) versus the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (right). Note 7 has a Spigen case, the S7 Edge has a Griffin case.
Samsung Galaxy Note 7 (left) versus the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (right). Note 7 has a Spigen case, the S7 Edge has a Griffin case.

What I love about the Note 7 is how clean the UI is in comparison to the S7 Edge.  I’m able to put many more app icons on each screen, and the icons are much more “professional” looking.  The S Pen works fantastically well, and I’m extremely impressed with the ability to write on the screen when it’s “off” (Samsung’s “Always On” display feature) and save the notes for later use.  Only slight issue is that the case tends to hinder even my E.T. fingers at pushing out the pen, but I’ll get used to this.  Unlike the Apple Pencil which I still keep in its original packaging because Apple couldn’t be arsed to design a holder with their covers.

While the screen is curved like the S7 Edge, it’s less pronounced and makes it much, much, much easier to grip with or without the case.  It really does feel much nicer in the hand over the S7 Edge.

The S Pen works fantastically well, and I’m extremely impressed with the ability to write on the screen when it’s “off” (Samsung’s “Always On” display feature) and save the notes for later use.  Only slight issue is that the case tends to hinder even my E.T. fingers at pushing out the pen, but I’ll get used to this.  Unlike the Apple Pencil which I still keep in its original packaging because Apple couldn’t be arsed to design a holder with their covers.

Here’s the first image I took with the Note 7.  It should be identical to that of the S7 Edge.

Note 7 image test
Note 7 image test

Finally, a word about the Iris scanner.  It’s a pain in the rear end.  I’ll be sticking with the finger scanner (and others) for the time being.

I’ll post a more in-depth review after a week’s use.

(Note: I was due to post a report on Guildford’s Comic Con, but WordPress’ text editor / image editor is playing silly buggers at the moment.  I’ll to sort the photos out in Photoshop and deal with them that way.. sigh)

No longer just Let’s Encrypt, cPanel offers free Comodo-backed SSL certificates

With the latest release (to the CURRENT tier, which is considered “release candidate” worthy) of cPanel/WHM, you can now obtain completely free 90 day SSL certificates from cPanel themselves (backed by Comodo) for your web site.  This requires version 58 of cPanel/WHM.  These certificates will automatically be renewed.

2016-07-18_13-35-39

This blog is already using them, and long may I do so.  As I’ve said earlier, obtaining SSL certificates for securing usernames and passwords or e-commerce is now the cheapest (e.g. free) it’s ever been.  There’s absolutely no excuse to run a web site that’s not secured by an SSL certificate now.  None.

If you don’t want to use Comodo backed SSL certificates, there will be a Let’s Encrypt plugin for cPanel/WHM appearing soon from cPanel themselves.

As Apple’s cloud services fall over and go splat..

(See Daily Mail: “Apple’s iCloud comes crashing down” which includes a quote from me courtesy of Twitter, but they managed to mangle the caption (9.2.3 versus 9.3.2) and also includes the typo of the week which is: But it is unlikely the tech giant knew it would unleash furry on the iPad Pro.” – this is why I use an ad blocker these days to prevent publications from getting revenue for poor editing)

.. I’m putting the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge through its paces.  Android has come far since I last used it in anger.  Yet there’s still no method of setting up a way of getting the phone to keep notifying me of an unread SMS – essential when you’re on-call and you’re in deep sleep.  There are third party apps, thankfully, but finding the right one is tricky.

I put Android Pay to use this morning.  Unfortunately, the uptake from British banks and Building Societies is a bit thin on the ground at the moment.  Thankfully my own bank has adopted Android Pay and it was just as easy to set-up as Apple Pay.  And even easier when it came to pay for a Costa coffee.  If anything, it felt faster.

The S7 Edge has a great camera built in – capable of even shooting in RAW format (requires that you switch to the Pro mode).   But even when on Auto, it takes some great pictures – take a look at this 12 megapixel shot of keys.  Focusing was extremely fast indeed.

Macro shot of some keys - focusing was very fast.
Macro shot of some keys – focusing was very fast.

I’m a bit undecided about the video.  I’ve not had a chance to put either the HD or UltraHD video shooting modes to use – but I have seen footage where it looks the person shooting the video has consumed 90 pints of beer and taken hallucinogenic drugs.  The background seems to distort and wobble.  It’s been pointed out that this is likely due to video stabilisation being enabled – that is, digital video stabilisation + optical image stabilisation = improbability drive effects.

I’ll get back to testing the video functions later.  Not important to me right now – I don’t shoot much video anyway, the important thing is stills photography which seems to me to be one of the best smartphone cameras on the market.

Call quality is excellent.  The unit supports EE’s Wi-Fi Calling out the box (you just need to enable it within the Phone settings), so if you have decent Wi-Fi, you can make calls over that rather than the cellular network.

Pretty much every app I had on the iPhone 6S Plus (bless it’s recently sold soul) is available under Android, and in some cases is a much better experience.  And like the iPhone 6S Plus, the Galaxy S7 Edge has a fingerprint scanner which works pretty well.  Not quite as spontaneous and as flexible as the iPhone, but it’s come leaps and bounds since the Galaxy S5 (which I have as a work phone) and is perfectly usable here.

The “edge” part of the S7 Edge is a lovely idea: you can access frequently accessed content, apps and contacts by simply swiping from the right hand curved edge of the phone.  Really makes a difference and the whole screen looks extremely impressive as a result too.

Google Play, which replaces the temperamental Apple App Store, works and I can remotely install apps from any web browser.  The S7 Edge also integrates into my Google Apps for Work account and I can manage the device remotely – so if it ever fell into the wrong hands, I can perform a remote wipe (or locate it, or both).

Overall I’m very impressed with the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge and I do not yet regret my move.  Time will tell how fast Samsung will roll out security and Android updates to the device (including new major versions of Android), but so far so good.