No, Dropbox, I do not want to upgrade to the Business edition

I pay Dropbox annually for the 1Tb edition of their service.  But they are constantly bugging me whenever I access the web interface to “try” the Business Edition which would cost me £55 per month minimum, and of which I have absolutely no interest in using.  I cannot disable these notices.

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This is in addition to the incredibly annoying pop-up when sharing files which prompts people to log in, even though you’re sharing to the world.

I’d happily switch over to my G Suite’s Google Drive service, but Dropbox is still the best in class for online storage.  As such, they have me by the danglies as a consequence.  But it won’t stop me from slapping them around the chops with a wet kipper for this constant and frustratingly annoying spam for their business edition of which I do not have any  desire or need for.

Even if I did have a need to use Dropbox for Business, their constant in-your-face spamming has put me off entirely.

When my annual subscription expires next year, I’ll be seeking alternatives – unless Dropbox reconsiders its position over these glorified spam adverts.

 

Crash! Bang! Wallop!

For the next couple of weeks, this blog may suddenly vanish, go offline, or perform weirdly (what, it wasn’t performing weirdly already? – Ed).  

I’m performing a variety of tests that should yield very favourable results for an upcoming new product that I can’t say anything about yet.  But trust me, it’s gonna be a good ‘un.

No longer just Let’s Encrypt, cPanel offers free Comodo-backed SSL certificates

With the latest release (to the CURRENT tier, which is considered “release candidate” worthy) of cPanel/WHM, you can now obtain completely free 90 day SSL certificates from cPanel themselves (backed by Comodo) for your web site.  This requires version 58 of cPanel/WHM.  These certificates will automatically be renewed.

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This blog is already using them, and long may I do so.  As I’ve said earlier, obtaining SSL certificates for securing usernames and passwords or e-commerce is now the cheapest (e.g. free) it’s ever been.  There’s absolutely no excuse to run a web site that’s not secured by an SSL certificate now.  None.

If you don’t want to use Comodo backed SSL certificates, there will be a Let’s Encrypt plugin for cPanel/WHM appearing soon from cPanel themselves.

Memset win Best Dedicated Hosting in the 2016 ISPA Awards!

We won, in part, due to my superb support team.  Couldn’t ask for a better bunch.  Always striving to be the best and fastest (response) for support in the industry.

ISPA Award Winners 2016

Best Dedicated Hosting winner: Memset

Memset’s response times, technical support options and resilience impressed the judges, as did having IPv6 as standard and their commitment to being carbon neutral.

You’ll never have to buy another SSL certificate again!

(At least not if you are a financial organisation or need some form of extended validation/identity confirmation)

The SSL certificate marketplace is undergoing an extraordinary transformation.  Once upon a time you could expect to pay a princely sum to obtain what is called an “SSL certificate”.  This is effectively a piece of code that you install on a server (whether it be web, email, or similar) that allows you to encrypt data between two end points (a client such as a web browser and a web server, for example).  The SSL certificate allows the client (browser) to identify the server it’s connecting to.

But as the Internet has grown, the need to protect data in transit (such as usernames and passwords, credit card details, or other personal information) has also increased.  To that end there has been many attempts to provide free or cheap SSL certificates to all and sundry.  Self-signed certificates are no longer good enough.  Unless you explicitly trust a self certificate within your browser, you’ll see all manner of warning messages.  No,  a trusted third party must now be present to ensure that your communications in a web browser are secure.

SSL certificate prices have been gradually becoming cheaper and cheaper over past few years.  I’ve picked up regular domain validated SSL certificates as little as 99 cents (US) or at the most around £2-3 per year.  The drake.org.uk wildcard certificate (which protects an unlimited number of us domains with a single certificate) only cost me 40 quid for two years.

But now things are getting even cheaper – cheap enough to be FREE!

Let’s Encrypt has been one such effort to bring SSL certificates to the masses, for free.  Completely free.  Having left beta, we are going to see a lot of companies and organisations offer Let’s Encrypt as part of their product or service.  cPanel, for example, will be integrating Let’s Encrypt as part of the next major release of cPanel/WHM.  This means that providing that the server operator/hosting company you’re hosting with allows it, your web site will be protected by an SSL certificate for free – automatically.

CloudFlare is another company that’s offering free certificates.  Their free tier allows you to encrypt between their servers and your own (origin) servers – combined with an origin SSL certificate that you install on your server that provides full, authenticated encryption between CloudFlare’s data centres and your server(s).

WordPress and Sucuri are also two other services offering free SSL certificates with their services.

So as you can see – the days of the paid SSL certificate appear to be coming to an end.  The only exceptions are special SSL certificates that require additional validation and assurance – normally Extended Validation (EV) certificates – the ones you’ll normally see at a bank’s web site – the company name all in green alongside the green lock symbol.  These certificates require a lot of paperwork.  This consequently costs quite a bit more money (and time).

But for us mere mortals, we may well never have to spend a single penny on SSL certificates for our sites or services ever again.  We can encrypt for free.  And that’s a good thing.