The past year has seen an influx of new smartphones flooding the market – all Android, and almost all of them touting at least three rear cameras.

The Huawei P30 Pro has perhaps shown the most promise – until the U.S. government came along and started their trade war with China – as well as the whole Huawei trustworthiness affair. This resulted in Google allegedly cutting Huawei’s access to Android updates at one point. Even with the recent thawing, it’s enough to have put me off considering Huawei smartphones.

I’ve used Google’s Pixel XL and Pixel 2 XL for a while, but even with a frequently updated OS, there have been substantial problems with the phone that have put me off going back to Android at all. I’ve read all the problems with the Pixel 3/3 XL and have been counting my chickens that I didn’t switch.

I am an iOS man, and I’m not likely to ever switch. Here are some statistics as to why that is the case:

  • 1,642 albums (15,648 songs) totalling 108.95Gb, or 37.5 days worth of music stored in Apple Music
  • 361 purchased iTunes films totalling 1.4Tb in total (if I were to download them all in HD), or 30 days worth of viewing back to back in one sitting
  • 38 purchased iTunes TV programmes totalling 947Gb in total (if I were to download them all in HD), or 24 days worth of viewing back to back in one sitting
  • 10,108 photos, 453 videos totalling around 97Gb (APFS) which are stored both on the Mac, iPad Pro and iPhone XS Max as well as the iCloud Photo Library

Switching between Apple Music and something like Spotify is possible with third party programs, but it’s a substantial pain-in-the-arse process and the music catalogues vary between the services which mean that I’d lose quite a few albums/tracks along the way. I know I’d definitely lose all the Studio Ghibli soundtracks if I were to switch to Spotify.

Moving my movies and TV shows to another service is near impossible unless I break the digital rights management of each title. This is illegal in the UK (even for the purposes of backup). The state of the streaming and physical disc union is a massive pile of poop at this point, but iTunes has almost always been the best experience. And the Apple TV 4K has been the best streamer. Newer TVs from the likes of Samsung and Sony are getting the Apple TV app, so content from iTunes is becoming more widely available across other devices. It’s still not ideal, but it’s something that consumers are having to live with if they want to rewatch their favourite films or TV shows.

I’ve also struggled with Android to try and replicate the sheer ease of use and simplicity of Apple’s Photos app. Google Photos has come very close, but it is substantially behind in some RAW camera formats (particularly earlier Sony RX100 models) and limitations in MP4 sizes has meant that I cannot upload my whole library to Google’s servers. I do use Google Photos to upload what I can, however, and my Google Nest Home Hub shows a series of photos from my travels – a bit like a digital photo frame – when I’m in the kitchen.

Then there is iOS itself. We get a major free version every year, and it’s generally very well supported for around 3-4 (and even in some cases 5) years during the lifetime of a device. And it’s regularly updated by Apple to fix major security flaws whenever they occur. When looking at my work’s policies for BOYD phones, we have had to pretty much rule out most Android phones because of the delay in which the device manufacturer roles out security updates. It’s really only Google’s Pixel phones that pass the grade and that kind of rules out the whole purpose of Android IMHO.

Finally, I have an Apple Watch (series 4) which still requires pairing with an iPhone for many functions. However, with the next release of WatchOS, the watch is going to start to gain a bit more independence from the phone. But it will still take a few more iterations before the Apple Watch is a truly standalone product.

So, this leads me to the iPhone 11. We should find out soon when Apple intends to announce this year’s new line-up. It’s not long to go – they usually announce them sometime in September. Rumours suggest that the current XS and XS Max line-up will be renamed “Pro”.

Rumours also suggest that there will be fairly modest upgrades this year, with the bulk of the good stuff coming in 2020. We’re unlikely to see 5G modems this year, and we’re likely to follow the trend of other smartphone manufacturers by having a third camera on the back of the phone – probably an ultra-wide lens.

My plan with EE should allow me to upgrade sometime at the end of September. Whether I will or not really depends on what Apple’s offering with the iPhone 11. I’d REALLY like to see is USB-C connectivity like the iPad Pro. Given the Macs, I work with all have USB-C ports, and I have multiple USB-C chargers, cutting down on Lightning connectors would be a real bonus. There are some sketchy rumours abound that the Pro range of iPhones will feature Apple Pencil support. Useful, but not essential to me (but I can imagine a trillion uses in my line of work).

As for cameras, I’ve been really happy with the iPhone XS Max. It is by far the best camera that Apple has rolled out in a phone. Some recent images that I took:

And I still have a significant amount of storage left for more films, TV shows, music and photos:

So I’d be perfectly happy to continue using the iPhone XS Max for another year if necessary. If I did upgrade, I’d still be on an upgrade anytime plan, but I’d effectively renew my contract for another 2 years – whereas next year I’d be free to leave EE if necessary. But so far I’ve had no reason whatsoever to do so – they’ve been brilliant.

I was going to post about the state of Apple Music in 2019 after its appalling launch which was besieged with technical problems. I tried to find some images from a previous version of this blog, but instead found these odd photos:

Apple is a strange company. It has come up with some rather lovely designs during its history. The Apple Magic Mouse 2 isn’t one of them. It’s a mish-mash of superb usability and horrible ergonomics combined with very decent battery life. I’ve been using them pretty much ever since I’ve had a Macintosh.

The Space Grey version of the Apple Magic Mouse 2 is very shiny!

I have been tempted by other Bluetooth mice before, and indeed earlier this year I bought a couple of Logitech MX Master 2S wireless mice. They’re ergonomic, chunky and feel great in the hand. My only complaint has been the scroll wheel has always felt either too loose in quiet mode, or when the ratchet mode is on, too noisy. Whereas the Apple Magic Mouse 2 has a surface area which acts like a touchpad which makes scrolling pretty much flawless. Plus the Apple mouse can scroll sideways much more easily.

The Logitech MX Master 2S – which can be used when charging

The MX Master 2S can also be charged whilst it’s being used, whereas with the Apple mouse you’ll need to turn it upside down in order to plug in the Lightning cable – thus it’s incapacitated whilst it is charging. This is made up, however, by a much better battery in the Magic Mouse. The Logitech MX Master 2S only seems to last 2 days before the battery runs out whereas the Magic Mouse lasts several weeks. Well, I’d say that my home MX Master 2S only lasts a couple of days – my work MX Master 2S does tend to last a couple of weeks, and both tend to get the same kind of use.

But I’ve had to go back to using a Magic Mouse 2 again because Apple do NOT make it easy if you ever need to reset your Mac’s PRAM, or go into recovery mode with non-standard Apple kit. The following image demonstrates:

Cables, dongles and non-Apple kit – oh my!

I wanted to reset my work 2018 Mac Mini’s PRAM as the USB-C (acting as a DisplayPort cable) to HDMI connected monitors tend to play Russian Roulette every time I switch the Mac on. Sometimes the Mac remembers the right order, and other days it doesn’t. Or sometimes the Mac doesn’t send the signal to the right monitor, necessitating cable fiddling. A PRAM reset might fix that, I thought.

First of all, the Magic Keyboard 2 wasn’t able to get the bloody Mac into PRAM reset mode wirelessly – not without physically attaching the keyboard to the machine via a Lightning to USB-A cable (thankfully the Mac Mini has two USB-A ports). That seemed to work. Then I needed to go into recovery mode to sort out something, but the MX Master 2S mouse wouldn’t work. As you can see above, the Mac’s firmware wanted me to connect an Apple wireless mouse. Any Bluetooth mouse that’s Bluetooth capable (and not an Apple mouse) and has been paired with the Mac beforehand will not work in recovery mode. I had to hook up the MX Master via a micro-USB cable to USB-A to get anything done.

So it’s a mix of battery life, being able to scroll properly on a Magic Mouse 2, and being able to move the mouse pointer effortlessly in Mac’s firmware/recovery mode that’s brought me back to the Magic Mouse.

Now, before anybody says anything – I’ve done a bit of research about using it, especially about allowing it to submit my photos to their cloud service for processing.

I’m relatively happy with the way the app deals with data – nothing unusual and nothing that other apps have done before.

So here are a few scary images to frighten people:

I also played with the de-ageing filter and the result is too horrible to post here.

First, it was Good Omens. Now it’s The Boys. Amazon Prime Video has been available on Apple TV devices for a while now. Not long, but long enough. I bought the 4K version of the Apple TV because I have a 4K TV.

I do have the Amazon Prime Video app on my LG 4K TV, but I don’t tend to use the built-in apps for the TV because the TV is getting old now and the app and WebOS updates are few and far between. An Apple TV device should continue to receive OS and app updates regularly for many years to come – and one only has to replace one component when Apple stops supporting that device, rather than having to replace an otherwise good working TV. This is why I despise the “smart” in Smart TV.

Amazon’s 21st century equivalent of adjusting a TV aerial

Amazon, like Netflix, has been commissioning original TV shows in UHD (4K). With Netflix and the right subscription, you’ll get the highest resolution out the box without any fuss. If it’s 4K, you’ll get 4K. If it’s HD only, you’ll get HD only. With Amazon, you’re relying on them to put the 4K version of the title on the home page. Except they rarely do. No, with Amazon, you have to dig deep to find the bugger and then add it to your wishlist so that you don’t lose it again.

I had tremendous difficulties playing Good Omens in 4K when it was first released. Error galore. And I had even more difficulty trying to find the link to get help with Amazon (though it turns out when you do find the help page, the contact us section is bottom left-hand side – it’s not as obvious as you think it is when you’re trying to look for it). We then spent about an hour going through a scripted support process before the case was escalated to Amazon Prime Video’s specialist support team.

The thing is, the LG TV could play the 4K version of Good Omens just fine. Yet the newer Apple TV running Amazon’ s own app couldn’t. Eventually, Amazon managed to fix it, but it left a bit of a bad taste.

And now we have a new Amazon series called The Boys. It’s a very good black comedy about a world where superheroes are vile and managed by a massive agency who look after their PR, which comes in handy whenever collateral damage from a superhero rescue comes into play. It’s an exceptional series, but again, I can’t play it in 4K on the Apple TV.

Here are things I’ve tried:

  • Signed out of Amazon, then signed back in again
  • Restarted the Apple TV
  • Signed out of Amazon, deleted the Amazon Prime Video app, restarted the Apple TV, downloaded the Amazon Prime Video app, and then signed in again
  • Sacrificed a small goat to the tech god, “Sodslaw”
  • Admired the extremely impressive Apple TV 4K screensavers when attempting to escalate the issue with Amazon

The reason I got angry about this in the first place was that the TV app on Apple TV made it clear it was a 4K show. But when you clicked on the link to open it, an error from Amazon’s Prime Video app popped up.

I tried to search for The Boys within the app. No joy. And I tried on the web site – again no joy – until today (one day after the release). I added it to the Watchlist so that I wouldn’t lose it again.

I’ve been in touch with Amazon, and I think they’re escalating this – but they also wanted me to restart my router. I said that I didn’t think that was going to be necessary, but they insisted. And that’s when I lost my temper and left the chat.

Some thoughts:

  • Apple and Amazon need to work more closely together
  • Amazon needs more developers onto the tvOS app
  • Amazon needs better QA testers for the tvOS app

If these so-called “cord-cutting” services are to succeed, they need to work flawlessly across the many platforms that they’re on. And support for these services needs to be beefed up. Streaming is only going to get more complex – especially if 8K is around the corner (my prediction: won’t see anything serious for the next 2-3 years and even then we’ll still be struggling with 4K like we are right now).